Thai jasmine rice named the world’s best rice

Thailand was voted to have the best fragrant rice in the world in the latest global competition held in Macau, China yesterday.

The competition, the 9th edition of the World Rice Conference, saw seven counties competing for the world’s best rice title – Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, the US, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar – entering 21 different rice varieties.

Thailand’s Hom Mali (fragrant) rice came out on top, taking home the title of World’s Best Rice to win the world’s title two years in a row.

Came second and third are Cambodia and Vietnam.

Last year, Thai fragrant from Chiang Mai took home the coveted prize at the eighth edition of the event.

Commerce Minister Aphiradee Tantraporn said that award is as an affirmation of Thai rice’s acceptance globally, adding that this will encourage more promotion of Thai fragrant rice.

World’s Best Rice took place for the first time in 2009 in Cebu of the Philippines and has rotated through countries that grow rice as a central crop. Its panel of judges comprises food experts, culinary consultants from the United States and acclaimed chefs who use 4 criteria; fragrance, flavor, glutinousness and appearance to decide on winners. The judges blind test the rice and award them points with no knowledge of their origin or type.

Altogether, Thai jasmine rice has won the accolade 5 times after being named best for flavor in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2016 and 2017. The Ministry of Commerce will use the latest win to both encourage continued stringent management of Thai rice quality and to promote the product.

World’s Best Rice competition was first held in 2009 in Cebu of the Philippines and was later held in rotations among rice-growing countries that grow rice as a central crop.

The 2017 World Rice Conference, the world’s most premier conference focused solely on the rice was held from 6 to 8 November 2017, at the Sheraton Grand Macao Hotel, located in Macau, P.R. China.

The panel of judges comprises food experts, culinary consultants from the United States and acclaimed chefs who use 4 criteria; fragrance, flavor, glutinousness and appearance to decide on winners.

The judges blind test the rice and award them points with no knowledge of their origin or type.